From Our Recipe Box: Roasted Heirloom Squash with Sea Salt and Local Honey

From Our Recipe Box: Roasted Heirloom Squash with Sea Salt and Local Honey

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From Our Recipe Box: Roasted Heirloom Squash with Sea Salt and Local Honey

November 2, 2017
Michel Nischan
     
Roasted Squash

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Roasted Heirloom Squash with Sea Salt and Local Honey

Squash takes just about any kind of heat. When you cook it as I do here, the flesh dehydrates a little and turns meaty, so all it needs is a little drizzle of honey and a sprinkle of salt. Squash is forgiving no matter how you cook it, but only if you start with a good specimen. If you prefer,cook it to the texture you like best, and don't follow a prescribed time. 

Serves 6 to 8

4-5 pounds hard winter squash in 2 varieties, such as butternut and kabocha, seeded (but not peeled) and cut into 1" slices or wedges, whichever shape best represents the original shape of the squash 

2 tablespoons local honey 

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 

2-3 tablespoons chopped fresh herbs, such as sage, rosemary, thyme, oregano, and marjoram 

Preheat the oven to 375°F.

Acorn Squash
Lightly drizzle the squash with the honey and oil in a large bowl. Using your fingers, rub the honey and oil into the squash pieces to distribute evenly. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Arrange the squash pieces, skin side down, on a baking sheet.

Bake the squash for 35 to 45 minutes, turning the pieces once or twice during cooking, or until the squash is fork-tender when pierced with a fork or a small, sharp knife.

Transfer the squash to a serving platter or bowl. Sprinkle with the fresh herbs, a little more honey, and a little sea salt. Serve hot.

This recipe is from my cookbook, Sustainably Delicious, published by Rodale Books.